1. g1988:

    This THURSDAY NIGHT, April 3rd, from 7-10 PM at G1988 (West), we’ve teamed up with our friends at Cartoon Network and clothing brand Rook, to bring you G1988 x Adventure Time, a group art show inspired by the awesome cartoon. The work for this show is REALLY REALLY GOOD, evident by the previewed pieces above. Over 65 artists will participate in the show! Rook will also be debuting their Adventure Time cap sure collection, and this exhibit will be the first place to purchase that as well. 

    THIS EXHIBIT IS RSVP ONLY! You can easily RSVP to attend by emailing us at rsvpgallery1988@gmail.com. It is REQUIRED THAT YOU RSVP. The show will only run through April 6th.

    Stop it g1988, you’re too perfect, I can attend art galleries and be a rambunctious child?

     
  2. Aled Lewis, Macklin. You Son of a Bitch.
Before he guarded the galaxy, he guarded us all… Even the people not in the galaxy. Prints on sale at Gallery 1988 West.

    Aled Lewis, Macklin. You Son of a Bitch.

    Before he guarded the galaxy, he guarded us all… Even the people not in the galaxy. Prints on sale at Gallery 1988 West.

     
  3. image: Download

    g1988:

Aled Lewis takes on Always Sunny In Philadelphia for his solo show, which opens TONIGHT, from 7-10 PM at G1988 (West)!! Join us, and Aled, as we open an incredible exhibit!

Gotta get to this gallery some time soon. This caught my eye, but scrolling through their previous exhibits made it clear that it’s one for me.

    g1988:

    Aled Lewis takes on Always Sunny In Philadelphia for his solo show, which opens TONIGHT, from 7-10 PM at G1988 (West)!! Join us, and Aled, as we open an incredible exhibit!

    Gotta get to this gallery some time soon. This caught my eye, but scrolling through their previous exhibits made it clear that it’s one for me.

     
  4. R. Land’s Little Bunny Foo Foo in Workaholics

    R. Land’s Little Bunny Foo Foo in Workaholics

     
  5. image: Download

    tachibanaportfolio:

by denchuZbrush maya

Don’t ever breed Pikachu and Caterpie

    tachibanaportfolio:

    by denchu

    Zbrush maya

    Don’t ever breed Pikachu and Caterpie

     
  6. pitchfork:

    Well played.

    I want three discs of “She Hates Me” yesterday. I want it eleven years ago when I would bump Come Clean during study time in the Friends School library, so that maybe I could have set in motion a chain of events leading to the world laid out here. Oh, and follow Printed Internet.

     
  7.  
  8. image: Download

    contemporary-art-blog:

Austrian artist Markus Schinwald, Margot, 2009Contemporary-Art-Blog

I smiled.

    contemporary-art-blog:

    Austrian artist Markus Schinwald, Margot, 2009
    Contemporary-Art-Blog

    I smiled.

     
  9. image: Download

    noirlacsourced:


Vampire Savior 2: The Lord of Vampire by Capcom


B.B. Hood lookin as crazy as a Red Riding Hood portrayal in a fighting game themed after classical horror characters should.

    noirlacsourced:

    Vampire Savior 2: The Lord of Vampire by Capcom

    B.B. Hood lookin as crazy as a Red Riding Hood portrayal in a fighting game themed after classical horror characters should.

    (Source: noirlac)

     
  10. the end

    probertson:

    image

    P-Rob: I hope this means you’re going on to better things that I’ll be able to spend money on for you. But if I’m being real w/ u, dude i’ve nvr met, i’m hoping more that it’s just the name of another beautiful piece of future art

     
  11. image: Download

    popculturebrain:

Marvelous.


Is it though? Cause I think instead of “Marvelous,” you meant to type “Marvel-ous,” as in it’s made by Marvel and is immune to criticism. If there’s one thing I’ve noticed amateur critics and commercial film students have in common, it’s a willingness to defend these films as “escapism” because they’ve been roped in as much as the rest of us but don’t want to suggest it’s a “good” movie.
Let me be clear: I’m not bothered if someone walks out of Thor and is like “killer explosions, I love Tom Hiddleston, I totally forgot about my work week for about two hours.”  But I don’t want to talk to you if I ask “how was Thor” and sweatstains spread over your pits before you hum “marrrrvelous.” Stand up for what you respect and like about art, and do not be afraid to admit that there are shitty aspects to this fandom that you’ve adhered your life to. Contrary to how some may feel, you’re actually more of a Thor fan if you admit that it isn’t perfect: at least you have a vested interest in the success of your adopted series.
If you’ve ever wanted me to take a hard line stance on something, here it is: if you buy tickets to movies like this, you cannot complain about the state of the movie industry. Because if we all woke up and held superhero movies (or even just superhero movie sequels!) to the same standard we hold for every other type of film, the movie business would collapse and maybe we’d get some new story concepts. The Dark Knight proves that it can be done right, but the audiences have to demand it, and theaters will blame faltering sales on piracy until it can’t be denied anymore. Don’t pay for shitty movies if you like movies. If you still want to see the movie, don’t lie to yourself and don’t lie to other people with sweeping statements of quality.
PS I’m only so upset because this time it’s coming from a tumblr I respect, popculturebrain, which sets a lofty goalpost for itself by name alone. If you like pop culture and namely the way it functions in the absence of money, then it’s hard for me to believe that you can watch a movie like this and be like “ahhh another sterling addition to the canon.” I’m not gonna bite your head off if you invite me to see Avengers VII: The Whedonscape. Be warned that afterwards I am gonna bite the movie’s head off, and I may even suck out the innards. And I will never write a one word review of it on tumblr.

    popculturebrain:

    Marvelous.

    Is it though? Cause I think instead of “Marvelous,” you meant to type “Marvel-ous,” as in it’s made by Marvel and is immune to criticism. If there’s one thing I’ve noticed amateur critics and commercial film students have in common, it’s a willingness to defend these films as “escapism” because they’ve been roped in as much as the rest of us but don’t want to suggest it’s a “good” movie.

    Let me be clear: I’m not bothered if someone walks out of Thor and is like “killer explosions, I love Tom Hiddleston, I totally forgot about my work week for about two hours.”  But I don’t want to talk to you if I ask “how was Thor” and sweatstains spread over your pits before you hum “marrrrvelous.” Stand up for what you respect and like about art, and do not be afraid to admit that there are shitty aspects to this fandom that you’ve adhered your life to. Contrary to how some may feel, you’re actually more of a Thor fan if you admit that it isn’t perfect: at least you have a vested interest in the success of your adopted series.

    If you’ve ever wanted me to take a hard line stance on something, here it is: if you buy tickets to movies like this, you cannot complain about the state of the movie industry. Because if we all woke up and held superhero movies (or even just superhero movie sequels!) to the same standard we hold for every other type of film, the movie business would collapse and maybe we’d get some new story concepts. The Dark Knight proves that it can be done right, but the audiences have to demand it, and theaters will blame faltering sales on piracy until it can’t be denied anymore. Don’t pay for shitty movies if you like movies. If you still want to see the movie, don’t lie to yourself and don’t lie to other people with sweeping statements of quality.

    PS I’m only so upset because this time it’s coming from a tumblr I respect, popculturebrain, which sets a lofty goalpost for itself by name alone. If you like pop culture and namely the way it functions in the absence of money, then it’s hard for me to believe that you can watch a movie like this and be like “ahhh another sterling addition to the canon.” I’m not gonna bite your head off if you invite me to see Avengers VII: The Whedonscape. Be warned that afterwards I am gonna bite the movie’s head off, and I may even suck out the innards. And I will never write a one word review of it on tumblr.

     
  12. 09:57 5th Nov 2013

    Notes: 966

    Reblogged from johndarnielle

    Tags: artculturewritingpeople

    Anonymous asked: but what's wrong with being willing to separate an author from their work? why is that so hard? especially ender's game, which, aside from one or two lines from some stupid boys in the book, holds next to none of card's horrible views. you shouldn't bar good literature just b/c the author is a terrible person.

    johndarnielle:

    gailsimone:

    Do what you want.


    I will choose to do the same. OSC is not just a raging homophobe, he actively worked to enact legislation to oppress rights for lgbtq people. He said he would try to bring down the government if they disagreed.

    Seriously, screw that guy. There are a thousand books I haven’t yet read that don’t have that guy attached.

    this is exactly my position on this kinda thing by the way. I don’t need to separate an author from his work if the author’s a truly terrible human being. nobody’s perfect - I don’t ask anybody to be perfect; I just ask them not to be, you know, nazis, or virulent homophobes. But if they are, then I don’t care how good their work is purported to be. I don’t have to listen to Burzum; there’s no shortage of amazing black metal that isn’t written by racist murderers. the amount of tremendous black metal that meets the “not the work of an appalling horrible person” yardstick is sufficient to excuse me from having to listen to the stuff made by assholes. so when people go into the “I separate the art from the artist” thing, I’m like - why? if we live several lifetimes, we should all be so lucky, we won’t read all the great books or hear all the great music. we can allow artists to be human and make mistakes, even big huge everybody-has-their-personal-lows mistakes, while still saying “artists who are just worthless garbage as people, who actively and unapologetically campaign to make others’ lives worse, don’t deserve to have their work read.” we will not actually miss much; we can put our attention elsewhere. there’s just no shortage of amazing books to read, incredible music to hear. unless one wants to claim “no no, these terrible-people artists are actually the best artists,” in which case I think one might want to more closely examine one’s aesthetics.

    For some reason lately I feel like I’ve started to really home in on my role models. John Darnielle, I would like to be you.

     
  13. savetheworldlikekeanu:

    fmchubs:

    Holy shit this is far and away the most interesting piece of art to come out of The Hunger Games trilogy….

    as always i enjoy reading your commentary. i think i have to agree. regaining interest for people who were on the fence and not into the books or whatever.

    Now that I think about it, your reply to my post about Cara Delevingne voicing a radio DJ in GTAV actually influenced me on this! I have to remember that when it comes to advertising, there are very very very very few accidental successes. WB didn’t say “find me an artist!” and randomly pick someone and wow here’s the design. More likely it was “find us an artist in this style, conveying this mood, including these subjects” and then weeks of back-and-forth between artist and ad execs. In a weird way, that doesn’t feel scary to me. So long as advertising doesn’t wholly consume art, it is its largest patron, and the delicate relationship between patron and artist existed before ads did.

    But art within capitalism is a topic that I’m pretty under-educated in. I’ve only ever considered it in regards to TV, which, until cable existed, was that wasteland of all art as ads. Sure, there were good shows, but the environment comes across as more oppressive to innovation than any other arena. Thanks to HBO and Netflix, this shit is changing faster than you can watch a whole season of House of Cards in one sitting.

    PS Thank you for the kind words! I have a feeling you’ll appreciate my next post.

    (Source: badassdigest.com)

     
  14. image: Download

    popculturebrain:

IMAX Poster: ‘The Hunger Games: Catching Fire' | Badass Digest
Finally, a ‘Catching Fire’ one sheet that doesn’t put me to sleep.

Holy shit this is far and away the most interesting piece of art to come out of The Hunger Games trilogy. The books and movies are interesting because teens killing each other is a brutal concept populated by irrational minds, but we know it isn’t new. This hits me like art scraped into the dried veneer, and that’s why marketing is insane— they’re targeting lost audience members like me (I was at the midnight showing for the first; I really doubt I’ll see Catching Fire in theaters.)

    popculturebrain:

    IMAX Poster: ‘The Hunger Games: Catching Fire' | Badass Digest

    Finally, a ‘Catching Fire’ one sheet that doesn’t put me to sleep.

    Holy shit this is far and away the most interesting piece of art to come out of The Hunger Games trilogy. The books and movies are interesting because teens killing each other is a brutal concept populated by irrational minds, but we know it isn’t new. This hits me like art scraped into the dried veneer, and that’s why marketing is insane— they’re targeting lost audience members like me (I was at the midnight showing for the first; I really doubt I’ll see Catching Fire in theaters.)

     
  15. Reading any article concerning techno-fear tickles me, because they help me remember that my generation is dangerously close to assuming power. What the authors of these types of articles fail to realize is that the Internet isn’t going to do anything. It already did, and now everyone’s trying to make our world catch up.

    My first independent use of a computer was snatching as much of Weird Al’s discography as I could find on Napster at the age of 9. By 12 I was building my minidisc collection: several hundred of my favorite songs, ripped from albums in my collection or the grasp of the Internet, on a portable, rechargable precursor to the iPod (which would come along just a couple years later). Now I discover music using websites like Hype Machine that aggregate hundreds of blogs and chart the most popular tracks alongside available streams.

    Point is, people my age and younger are inundated with the idea that media, owned or not, can be (note: not should be) broken down to its components and freely accessible at any time. This ain’t just music, take a look at the many context-devoid lines of Family Guy dialogue racking up millions of views on Youtube. Wikipedia, launched a year after Napster, provides textual info in the same fragmented, immediate fashion. It’s not that consumers are making a choice to steal, it’s that if you rip a 128kbps track from a Youtube video of a song, it doesn’t feel like stealing. (Which is basically why all those “YOU WOULDN’T DOWNLOAD A CAR” anti-piracy ads are a joke.)

    But, to tie this in with the real crux of the article: I see streaming as a fair, forward-thinking solution to stemming industry bloodflow in a world where I can now type “[song title] .mp3 download” into world-renowned criminal tool Google and find multiple illicit copies. But the problem is that if you dig money, you don’t give a fuck about what’s fair. The industry spent a few years failing to penalize consumers with rare, random court cases that served to illuminate their greed, so they wised up: “Instead of finding a way to make more money for all involved with this remarkable, here-to-stay technology, let’s just penalize the artists for the money lost through piracy! It’s their fault for sticking with us!” Somebody has to suffer and Geffen’s second yacht cannot feel feelings.

    I don’t say this to justify piracy (cause I can’t and won’t, shit’s indefensible and I am a bad person). It is in the best interest of the music companies to convince consumers that we’re the ones hurting the artists and vice-versa. They refused to change, and they failed to make us change, so that means artists have to change (which is totally the sort of stress you want to lay on your cow when you’re running low on milk).

    The obvious course of action is to turn it back on them, but how? Labels are still too big a gatekeeper and I don’t want to lay more work on the shoulders of starving artists, especially considering it’s not their job to adjust to market change (hmmm.m i Wonder who shouldlve don that lol). I’m sure labels have market research steering them away, but I’m surprised we haven’t seen a streaming system with a time delay: you can listen to a song once every 12 hours, otherwise you have to pay. Same exact model that keeps people playing Candy Crush and Farmville and the next wildly successful source of irritating Facebook notifications. Since these sorts of games are A New Thing That People Enjoy, the industry will probably ignore the model, but on the flip side they will try anything to avoid paying their artists fairly so who knows?

    Either way, Byrne fears the Internet more than he fears the hands in his pockets. He’s afraid artists won’t be able to transition between giving music away and selling it, but he’s only showing his age by discounting the current erupting force in music: EDM. Look at ANY professional DJ capitalizing off the glut: given remix culture, fans’ listening habits (i.e. there aren’t many appropriate places to blast house music), less market visibility compared to pop/rock/hip-hop, and the fact that 90% of the songs a DJ spins are not going to be his own… How are these guys still alive? Are thousands of frat boys signed up for Beatport without my knowledge? You need to be headlining Las Vegas before releasing physical copies of your music is even practical, so why aren’t the DJs starving in such quantities? (Not a rhetorical question, actually a really fucking important question that everyone involved in music, industry and artists alike, needs to answer fast.)

    Anamanaguchi released two albums for free before raising five times their $50k Kickstarter goal for the sake of distributing their third. (Yes, Good Guy Anamanaguchi runs a Kickstarter for a product that already exists rather than a pipe dream.) Girl Talk can sell his albums now, but only after he became the face of a subgenre and gained enough klout that other musicians wouldn’t sue him for it (oh and All Day is still free in all formats). How about Lorde, who released her debut EP eleven months ago on Soundcloud while still living with her parents in New Zealand; you can’t buy anything on Soundcloud! Or New Zealand for that matter! So of course Universal signed her faster than she could say “dingo” in a sultry coo, she is everything that the pop industry ain’t. That’s why she’s, uh… Sealed in a vacuum of success? wait hm im trying to figure out the opposite of going down in cata-fucking-strophic flames

    It’s stories like theirs that make me think Thom Yorke and Byrne are right, that the music industry is in the middle of a long death rattle. I don’t know who was the first to find success through independent digital release, but I want to thank her for proving to everyone that we don’t need the labels. They were always meant to be a convenience, but it’s now more obvious than ever before. As time passes, more talented artists realize this and break through via alternative routes. Those artists begin making enough money to sustain their own online store, making it clear to all musicians coming after that the labels are not required for production, distribution, advertising or merchandising. Time to call hospice.